Village History
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Are there any more at home like you?

Hazel Pamplin wrote this account of her great aunts who married Canadian brothers in and after World War One.

My Grandparents, William Jeremiah (born 1866) and Ellen Christmas (born 1869) had 11 children, eight girls and three boys. One girl and all three boys died in infancy. My mother was the youngest of the seven remaining girls.

William Barratt from Iowa had two girls and three boys and moved to Gabriola Island, Canada when World War I broke out. Sons Joseph and older brother Jack joined the Canadian Expedition to fight the Kaiser. They left brother Tom at home to care for their ageing parents.

Jack and Joseph fought in France. Jack was wounded there and recuperated in Bordon, Hampshire. His nurse was Alice May Christmas (known as May and my Aunt). Jack and Alice May were married on the 1st October 1918 in East Meon Church. May got married from 2 Temple Brow Cottage, but the family lived in other houses in the village at various times.

Joseph met May’s sister Millie and when the troops went home, Millie sailed to Canada to marry him. Brother Tom enquired if, “there were any more like you” and corresponded with yet another sister, “Dolly” who also sailed over and they eventually married too….

Three Christmas sisters married three Barratt brothers. After the Barratt parents passed away all three families re-located to Camas, Washington, USA.

Six of the daughters outside Barnards, c 1980. L to R, Nellie Goddard, May Barratt, Dolly Barratt, Millie Barratt, Lillie Nicholson, Rose Mauback. The eldest sister, Maud Christmas, had died by this time.

Six of the daughters outside Barnards, c 1980. L to R, Nellie Goddard, May Barratt, Dolly Barratt, Millie Barratt, Lillie Nicholson, Rose Mauback. The eldest sister, Maud Christmas, had died by this time.